#StoryCraft Starter - Conflict

I'm posting this a couple of days before #storycraft chat because we are checking out of the hotel tomorrow at noon, and I'm not sure if my internet access ends tonight, or at check out. I'm sure you'll all think the article is interesting, so do try to save your gems of insight for the chat itself, when most people will be on. I will be getting home about 3 hours before the chat begins but that will be 5a.m. after a 9 hr flight and a long day, so I will probably crash the moment we get home! Have a great chat and I hope to see you next week :) Today’s #storycraft starter comes from the always useful babblings of Scott Eagan. In his recent post, “Conflict is Key”, he discussed the problems he encounters in submissions which are well written, style-wise, but have conflict issues which are deal-breakers. The idea that many submissions lack conflict shouldn’t be a surprise to any of us, what I found most interesting about this post was that he also finds that many submissions actually have too much conflict, are too complex.

How is the balance of conflict in your work in progress? How do you assess it? Can you assess it, or do you need a reader/critique partner to help you see it? How do you fix it when you find there is too little conflict, or too much?

As an aside and a little extra reading, I thought I’d also link to Scott’s slightly more recent post “If You Want To Be A Better Writer, Take The Time To Learn” It’s a great article for those chomping at the bit to be published, or who reject the idea that there is any real craft to learn in this art that we love. It is also a pretty good description of why #StoryCraft Chat exists.

As I wrote in my previous post, this ‘starter’ is just in case anyone wants to get together and chat about the craft while I’m away – I hope that you do and that you have a great chat. I’ll do my best to put up transcripts, when I emerge from my hibernation!

Happy Writing!

Dani.